Bill Shorten backs award for Australian doctor’s Thai rescue bravery

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They had gone into the Tham Luang cave in the northern province of Chiang Rai on June 23, for a quick excursion after soccer practice, when a rainy season downpour flooded the tunnels.

They were found dishevelled and emaciated but alive on a muddy ledge 4km inside the cave nine days after they went missing.

Teacher Kru Nice says 14-year-old Adun Sam-On has always been a leader, despite the fact he doesn't have his parents with him or even an official home.

When asked how she felt when she found out Adun was trapped in a cave, Kru said "I was so anxious".

"I wish them a speedy recovery so we can play football together again".

The stunning rescue of 12 boys and their coach earlier this week spurred jubilation in Thailand and made the team famous worldwide.

Volanthen praised the entire worldwide rescue team, which included 90 of the best scuba divers from around the world, for saving the group, who became trapped when monsoon rains struck on June 23 and flooded their exit. The footage, released by Thai officials Wednesday, shows eight of the boys sitting up in their hospital beds, clad in hospital gowns and face masks.

"Some of them were asleep, some of them were wiggling their fingers". On Tuesday authorities said some of the boys had asked to eat bread with chocolate spread, but mostly they'll be given a food similar to milk which is rich in proteins and nutrients.

Another diver, Jason Mallinson, 50, from Huddersfield, said the team left messages for the children as they flew back to the United Kingdom saying: "We're very glad we could get you out alive".

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"They were making progress, but it was very little progress and they were exhausting themselves spending maybe five or six hours and covering 40 or 50 meters (yards)".

A Belgian rescue diver involved in the operation told Dutch broadcaster NOS that ultimately not much diving was required on the way out, because a lot of water had been pumped out of the cave. "You can't blame the coach and you can't blame the kids", Thongchai said.

Plans to turn the rescue operation into a movie are also in the works, with two production companies racing to turn the extraordinary story into a film. Ivanhoe Pictures President John Penotti announced that they are in negotiations with Thailand's Navy and government to develop the film.

Several studios have expressed interest in producing films based on the rescue, Deadline reported.

Pure Flix's Managing Partner Michael Scott, who resides in Thailand and went on site during the rescue operation took to Twitter on Tuesday to make the company's announcement on the movie. They were allowed to again visit but had to stay more than 6 feet away.

"They and their families won't have the capacity to cope with this kind of thing".

He told the Mail, "We were extremely fortunate that the outcome was the way it was".

Doctors, divers and other rescuers were posted along the twisting corridors monitoring the boys as they were passed through using a system of ropes, pulleys and rubber piping.

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