Trudeau comments will cost Canada ‘a lot

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US President Donald Trump's trade adviser Peter Navarro has apologised for having said there was "a special place in hell" for Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Before the apology, some USA lawmakers on Tuesday questioned the strong language the White House and Trump have used toward Canada in contrast to the praise he gave North Korea at Tuesday's summit in Singapore.

He said in a press conference that it was his mistake that he used such a language as he wanted to send an important message to the G7 members.

The G7 summit came after the Trump administration chose to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from the European Union (EU), Canada and Mexico, which had drawn strong opposition from the domestic business community and USA major trading partners. Appearing on separate news shows, Kudlow accused Trudeau of "betrayal" and Navarro called the news conference a "stunt" and went on to assail the prime minister in unusually harsh terms.

Trump was furious after Trudeau had said at the end of a contentious economic summit in Quebec that he wouldn't let Canada be pushed around in trade relations with the United States. Kudlow was hospitalized after suffering a mild heart attack when he returned to Washington. He is expected to make a full recovery.

When asked by the Journal interviewer if he was apologizing, Mr. Navarro said, "Yes, absolutely". The president's chief economic advisor told Jake Tapper on Sunday that Trudeau "stabbed us in the back" with his post-G7 remarks, calling it a "sophomoric play".

He made the apology - something that former US ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman, among others, was demanding that he do - during a Wall Street Journal event today in Washington.

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Most analysts agree that the tariffs would also be bad for the U.S. American consumers would have to pay US$5,000 to US$7,000 more for their vehicles on average, potentially reducing U.S. auto sales by 4 million to 5 million units a year, said DesRosiers, who called it "a nightmare scenario".

The United States imposed new tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum less than two weeks ago on a "national security" basis.

Trudeau and his ministers were careful to say nothing that would add fuel to Trump's ire, hoping it will dissipate once the president is no longer stressed about his historic summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

"That's going to cost a lot of money for the people of Canada. "(Trudeau) learned. You can't do that.

Trump said it "didn't look friendly" but it was "very friendly".

The insults stemmed from a closing G7 press conference on Saturday in which Trudeau called United States steel and aluminum tariffs "insulting" and pledged to proceed with previously announced retaliatory tariffs.

Navarro "should have kept his big mouth shut because I don't think that helps us in foreign policy", said Senate Finance Chairman Orrin Hatch of Utah. "Politicians can get into disagreements and they can have heated disputes, but you have to think about where does this go, how bad could it get - and the disputes are over a really, really small share of GDP".

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