Rebel Wilson's record defamation payout in Australia slashed by millions to £340,000

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The articles alleged Wilson had lied about her age, her name and her upbringing in Australia, and were featured across Australian magazines, including Bauer's Australian Women's Weekly, New Weekly and OK Magazine.

The night before the decision, Wilson took to Twitter to reveal she wasn't bothered by the publisher's appeal.

The Court of Appeal found there was no basis for Wilson to be awarded financial damages for the potential loss of roles, setting aside the economic damages entirely.

Bauer did not, however, appeal the verdict that the articles were defamatory, but argued the Australian-record damages awarded in September were excessive. The legal process has run its course and Bauer welcomes the court's decision to set aside the entire award of damages for economic loss.

In June previous year a six-person jury found in favour of Wilson's claim against the publisher of Woman's Day and the Australian Women's Weekly.

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That sum would have been the largest defamation payment ever ordered by an Australian court.

When Wilson won the case past year, it was an Australian record for a case, much higher than the AUS$389,000 maximum previously set, by using her "global reach" as justification.

The actress is now filming in Europe, and ahead of the decision, took to Twitter last night to say that regardless of the level of payout, she had won the case.

The judge who determined the initial payout had relied on testimony from Wilson and two Hollywood agents that the articles, which were not published in the United States, still would have influenced movie industry decision makers, the appeals court judges added.

Apparently some weight loss companies are using her image to sell their shit, and Wilson's not into it. While this case was never about the money for me, I do hope to receive as much as possible to give away to charities and to support the Australian film industry.

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