Meaningful vote rejected: how key MPs voted on the Brexit amendment

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The House of Commons voted 324 to 298 to defeat an amendment to the EU (Withdrawal) Bill which would have removed her government's power to unilaterally walk away from talks with Brussels.

The government was putting a combative spin on the concessions Tuesday evening: "The Brexit Secretary has set out three tests that any new amendment has to meet - not undermining the negotiations, not changing the constitutional role of Parliament and Government in negotiating worldwide treaties, and respecting the referendum result", a spokesperson for the Brexit department said in a statement.

After winning Tuesday's ballot over changes to a future "meaningful vote" on a final agreement with Brussels in her European Union withdrawal bill, May's plans to end more than 40 years of membership in the bloc were still on track.

The issue seen as most likely to provoke a rebellion was that of giving MPs a "meaningful vote" on the final Brexit deal.

Theresa May has suffered a ministerial resignation ahead of crunch Commons votes on Brexit, with Phillip Lee hitting out at the Government's "irresponsible" approach.

The Government has avoided a major defeat on its Brexit Bill after a last-minute concession, Tory rebel Dominic Grieve explains just exactly what the concession was.

The shock move came as the Prime Minister warned senior ministers in her Cabinet that defeat on a series of Lords amendments over the next two days would undermine the Government and make negotiations with Brussels harder. The views expressed therein are not necessarily those of stlucianewsonline.com, its sponsors or advertisers.

If the government fails to pass the bill as it is, it will be forced to change what it asks for in negotiations with the European Union -undermining May's position and possibly threatening her job as Prime Minister.

In a tense atmosphere where it was not clear which way the vote would go, the government secured its victory only after offering concessions to one of the leaders of a group of Conservative lawmakers who were threatening to vote against May. Its Lords were instrumental in bringing about some of the amendments that have been sent back to the Commons.

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But Solicitor General Robert Buckland publicly implied that Government would be accepting part of Grieve's amendment, and said that a "structured discussion" would take place with rebels.

But Tory MP Andrew Bridgen, a leading Brexit backer, said the concessions could "come back to haunt" the government if they amounted to a veto over the terms of the UK's departure.

MPs are to debate her government's plans for future customs relations with the European Union.

Nicky Morgan has been an outspoken critic of Brexit, but she backed the government following its concessions.

Davis on Tuesday told the BBC, "that was the decision of the British people. and whatever we do, we're not going to reverse that".

Raising a point of order in the House of Commons, Soubry - who is a Remainer and has herself suffered abuse in the lead-up to Tuesday's Brexit vote - told the House: "To my knowledge at least one honourable member on these benches will today and tomorrow not vote in accordance with their conscience because of threats to their personal safety, to members of their parliamentary staff and members of their family".

"Time will tell as to whether this is just another attempt to buy off the rebels or a real attempt at consensus".

MPs, ministers and officials all agreed Tuesday that a soft Brexit or even the prospect of no Brexit is greatly increased - so too the prospect of a snap early election before the end of the year.

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