Ivanka Trump's 'Chinese proverb' might not be real

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Asian Twitter couldn't resist having a little fun after reading an Ivanka Trump tweet that she described as a "Chinese Proverb".

On Twitter itself, several users panned her for writing a "fake" Chinese proverb and called her out for the quote.

People in China began tweeting other sayings they thought Ivanka might have meant to use.

The first daughter and senior presidential adviser sent off what seemed to be a note of encouragement as her dad sat down in Singapore with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. "Please help!" the news channel for Sina - the company behind Weibo, China's largest Twitter-like platform - wrote on its official social media account.

There was no agreement in the responses, although some people suggested Ivanka was alluding to a tale about a man who tried to dug up a mountain that he found in his way, according to the Telegraph.

On social media site Weibo, some quoted similar sayings that are popular in China, such as: " Don't give advice while watching others playing a chess game".

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Michael Li wrote, "For the record, this is not a Chinese proverb but a piece of "mysterious East" wisdom made up by Westerners".

It's not the first time she has incorrectly described a quotation as Chinese.

Ivanka Trump's family has a lot of fans in China.

"It sounds more legitimate and credible to pronounce a quote coming from the ancient civilization of China", he added.

It may have originated in 1903 in "The Public" - a Chicago-based magazine - and evolved over the years, according to a 2015 article by Quote Investigator. Actually, the saying has been occasionally ascribed to the famous Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw, though there's no evidence of him ever having used it. In 2013, she tweeted: "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life", a quote she attributed to Confucius. "To be fair, the Chinese language has hundreds and arguably thousands of times more proverbs and sayings than any other language", Herzberg said.

'But why are Trump WH (White House) aides giving our proverbs to China, increasing our proverb deficit?' he quipped.

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