Britain Hopes US Will Honour Commitments On Trade

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Moving onto tariffs, Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau denounced Trump's plan to slap hefty tariffs on steel and aluminum imports on key USA trading partners.

US President Donald Trump continued to excoriate his Group of 7 summit allies in a series of tweets from Singapore, where he is due to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in a historic summit Tuesday.

Mr Trump's looming summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un heightened tension, and White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow accused Mr Trudeau of betraying Mr Trump with "polarising" statements on trade policy that risked making the U.S. leader look weak on the eve of the historic North Korea summit.

Experts say the Trudeau spat and the likelihood of tariffs from the European Union and Canada will result in a trade war. "It's a betrayal. He's double-crossing", he said Sunday. "We need to avoid a continued tit-for-tat escalation", she said. "$800 Billion Trade Deficit ..."

Saturday, Trump summit pulled the USA endorsement of the summit communique - a joint statement that was signed by all the other G7 participants: Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United Kingdom.

Trump's unpredictability and his history of not following through on all his threats lead some in the Canadian government to believe he might pull back from the auto tariffs threat.

Having left the G7 summit in Canada early, Mr Trump's announcement on Twitter that he was backing out of the joint communique torpedoed what appeared to be a fragile consensus on a trade dispute between Washington and its top allies.

Trudeau, who threatened retaliatory tariffs, also said Canada would not be "pushed around".

In response to initial tweets critical of her country and prime minister, Canada's foreign minister, Chrystia Freeland, said her nation "does not conduct its diplomacy through ad hominem attacks".

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"POTUS is not going to let a Canadian Prime Minister push him around", said Larry Kudlow, director of the National Economic Council. Trudeau stuck our president in the back.

"Prime Minister Trudeau is being so indignant, bringing up the relationship that the USA and Canada had over the many years and all sorts of other things. but he doesn't bring up the fact that they charge up to 300 percent on dairy - hurting our Farmers, killing our Agriculture!" "He's not going to allow the people to suddenly take pot shots at him".

Another stumbling block was the part regarding climate change, where the U.S. didn't want to see any reference to the Paris Agreement, from which the Trump administration has withdrawn, The Star reported. Still, numerous Canadian officials, including Trudeau's spokesperson, noted that he said nothing new or anything that hadn't been discussed with Trump in private.

He also suggested something more nefarious may have been afoot when Navarro made the comments. "I like to think that the cool approach is a good way, wait this thing out and see what the next shiny object is", Frazer said.

And Americans are practically apologizing on behalf of their president.

Trump blew apart a G7 summit in Canada over the weekend, blasting Trudeau as "very dishonest and weak" and raising the prospect of tariffs against auto imports, a move that would imperil the Canadian economy.

"PM Justin Trudeau of Canada acted so meek and mild during our @G7 meetings only to give a news conference after I left saying that, "US Tariffs were kind of insulting" and he 'will not be pushed around, '" Trump tweeted.

"This week started with @realDonaldTrump boosting a Chinese company identified as a national security threat to the U.S. It ended with him standing up for Russian Federation and alienating our allies at the G7".

G7 includes the seven leading industrialized countries of Britain, the United States, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and Canada.

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