Africans Outraged Over 'Racist' Trump Remarks, Demands Apology

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On the eve of the eighth anniversary of the January 12, 2010, natural disaster that devastated Haiti, the president, in the Oval Office, is said to have wondered aloud why he should allow immigrants from "shithole countries" like Haiti, El Salvador and African nations to enter the United States.

Notably, the White House did not deny Trump's comments and instead endorsed the spirit of what he appeared to be saying.

"All of you who over the last few years have uttered that exhausted, lazy, uninformed, uneducated response of calling me and others who point out racist behavior "racists, ' you know what you can go do?" Although the United States has a complicated racial history, including slavery, segregation and persistent economic disparities between whites and minorities, Trump's most recent predecessors from both parties have used their position to promote equality and have endorsed immigration policies that brought millions of people from Africa and Latin America to the U.S.

Ben Marter, a spokesman for Durbin, did not provide details of the conversation but said the senator was "encouraged" by Trump's reaction. Ryan went on to recall how his own relatives immigrated to the United States from Ireland.

But South Africa's ruling African National Congress called Trump's comments "extremely offensive". He has to know, like we all do, that xenophobic commentary plays well with his base, the people who were more than happy to put him in office because they could seamlessly project their racism and misogyny onto his celebrity persona.

"We, along with the president, are committed to solving an issue many in Congress have failed to deliver on for decades", the statement said.

Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC) did not say that the President used the language Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL) has accused him of.

After an emergency session to discuss Mr Trump's remarks, a group of 54 African ambassadors to the United Nations said it was concerned at the continuing and growing trend from the USA administration toward Africa and people of African descent to denigrate the continent and people of colour.

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"The words used by the president, as related to me directly following the meeting by those in attendance, were not 'tough, ' they were abhorrent and repulsive", tweeted Arizona Sen. Brinkley said Trump was the most racist president since Woodrow Wilson, who served from 1913 until 1921.

"Never said take them out".

The President on Friday denied using the crass and racist language to describe countries he does not think are worthy of sending immigrants to the U.S.in a series of posts on Twitter.

Calling someone a bigot is not a step to be taken lightly, but now "the arguments for being reticent seem absurd", wrote John Cassidy of The New Yorker.

In Haiti, President Jovenel Moise's government issued a strongly worded statement denouncing what it called a "racist" view of Haitian immigrants and people from African countries.

Trump previous year ended the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which provided protection from deportation and the ability to legally work in the country.

The U.S. president is hurting himself both at home and overseas with his latest comments, some Africans said. The news anchor also addressed Trump supporters.

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