Up next: Hurricane Jose and where it's headed

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However, after Monday night, Jose may slam on the brakes hard, ceasing almost all forward motion, likely setting up a roller-coaster-like path that will take the storm in a series of loops, circles, dips and dives over for the entirety of next week.

In a pocket of weak steering winds in the open Atlantic, Jose is expected to make a clockwise loop.

CBS North Carolina Meteorologist Kristin Ketchell says at this point, Jose is unlikely to impact the east coast of the USA, but our weather team will continue to monitor Jose for any changes or shifts in track during the coming days. It is forecast to weaken to Category 1 strength in a few days, with winds between 75 and 90 miles per hour.

Forecast models agree the storm will turn toward the east coast of the United States, but longer term forecasts are less definitive.

Hurricane Jose was barely a hurricane on Tuesday while it tracked eastward in the Atlantic.

Downtown Miami on September 11, 2017, after it was hit by Hurricane Irma.

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The big question is: Is Jose something for the United States to worry about?

"The three-day cone still has it to the east of us moving parallel".

Anything beyond those five days is nothing more than an educated guess, as a lot can happen in between now and then.

The center's official forecast finds Jose just over 400 miles from Jacksonville, Florida on Sunday morning. As a much stronger Category 4 storm, the hurricane passed only 85 miles from the island nation of Antigua and Barbuda last weekend.

Spaghetti charts for Jose show a complicated future for the storm. If history is a guide, more will be on the way. The upside is hurricane season slows down from here until the end of November, so everyone along the coasts should be able to breathe easy again in a few short months.

"Even outside the loop it won't be the same path as Hurricane Irma".

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